Blog

Laura’s Story: Talking About Economic Empowerment at the YMCA

33425647 10216041061042376 7832393019155283968 o[June 8, 2018] – Laura is a regular at her local YMCA (the Y), so she knew it would be a safe and welcoming place to share her knowledge and experience with gym-goers. Last week, instead of heading up to the gym equipment as usual, she set up a table where people could stop by to learn more about domestic violence and financial abuse. Over the last few months, SOAR members have been hosting similar small “Women Talking Money” events across Rhode Island.

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We Can Change The World

Cali Laura Rep Tanzi[May 25, 2018] – Lobbying in its purest form is a conversation. It is the act of talking to elected officials about issues that matter. As a member of SOAR, I am active at the Rhode Island State House. I testify at committee hearings and make my voice heard through engaging in discussions with my legislators in the General Assembly.

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Our Legislative Priorities

Legislative Priorities Postcard 2018 fair wages front forweb[May 11, 2018] – A central part of SOAR is legislative advocacy. Our activism within SOAR has allowed us to use our experience with domestic violence to bring about change in our community. 

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#talkingchange: What is Financial Abuse?

Financial Abuse[April 20, 2017] – When we were first married, we both worked in the restaurant industry. I always had wads of cash in my apron at the end of each shift. He wanted to be helpful, and wanted to be my “personal financial assistant,” so he’d make deposits for me.

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RI Must Keep Guns Out of the Hands of Dangerous Abusers

Protect RI Families 2017[April 6, 2017] – Yesterday, I spoke at the State House as a survivor of domestic violence to support the Protect Rhode Island Families Act. It was an honor, and a daunting task to speak on behalf of the nearly 10,000 Rhode Islanders each year who are victims of domestic violence. I also spoke for the victims who are no longer with us and able to speak for themselves—from 1980 through 2016, 177 Rhode Islanders lost their lives to domestic violence homicide. Seventy-five of these individuals (42%) were killed with firearms.

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